art, folklore, metaphysical art, pagan

Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice, Yule, Mid-Winter or Alban Arthan is the celebration of the rebirth of the sun after the longest night of the year.  It is one of the eight solar festivals comprising the Wheel of the Year.  Nourished in the womb of the Goddess during the dark time of the year, the sun symbolises the God born anew.  Plants that remain evergreen such as fir trees, holly and mistletoe are used as decorations.

The Goddess at Winter Solstice wears a crown of holly and mistletoe as she awaits the birth of her child.

The Winter Solstice Goddess Print is available in two sizes:
https://magickmermaid.com/Magick-Goddess-Pagan-Celtic-Mythology-Art.html

Magickal Oak in Winter Print is part of the Magickal Oak Series:
https://magickmermaid.com/GreenMan-and-GreenWoman-Art-Prints.html

folklore, pagan

A Happy Lughnasadh to Everyone!

Lughnasadh

Summer has passed its zenith and although temperatures are still quite warm (in the Northern Hemisphere), the sun sets a bit earlier each day.  Some crops are ready to harvest and preserve for the coming cold months.

Lughnasadh, named for the Irish Sun God Lugh, is celebrated on the first or second day of August.  It is the first of three harvest festivals.  This festival celebrates the grain harvest as well as fruits and vegetables that ripen in late Summer.  A perfect time to try a new bread recipe, dry herbs, preserve fruits and veggies!

Besides giving thanks for the abundance of the first harvest, this is a good time to reflect on the goals and projects you began earlier in the year. Have they come to fruition as you planned? Or do they still need more work to develop into what you envisioned? There is still time to edit and revise before the next harvest!

Wheat Harvest

 

art, magickal fantasy art, pagan

Imbolc – Celtic Sun Goddess Brighid

Goddess of Fire and Fertility

Imbolc celebrates the Goddess in her incarnation as the Bride of the returning Sun God. For the celebration of Imbolc, many candles are lit to symbolise the return of light and heat represented by the Sun God. Grain dollies made from the sheaves of the last harvest represent the Bride. The Goddess and God await the return of Spring and their sacred marriage at Beltaine.

Brighid (or Brid) represents the supreme Mother. She is the Celtic Sun Goddess of fertility, fire, creative inspiration, healing and protector of children. She is honoured at Imbolc, 2nd of February. Her symbols include blackberries, natural wells dedicated to her and the heart, an ancient symbol of feminine power. She holds a cauldron of fire as the sun rises in a lush green valley.

Wishing everyone a joyful Imbolc!

 

Brighid is available in two sizes on https://magickermaid.com

folklore, pagan

A Happy Lughnasadh to All!

Lughnasadh

Summer has passed its zenith and although temperatures are still quite warm (in the Northern Hemisphere), the sun sets a bit earlier each day.  Some crops are ready to harvest and preserve for the coming cold months.  Lughnasadh, named for the Irish Sun God Lugh, is celebrated on the first or second day of August.  It is the first of three harvest festivals.  This festival celebrates the grain harvest as well as fruits and vegetables that ripen in late Summer.  A perfect time to try a new bread recipe!


Besides giving thanks for the abundance of the first harvest, this is a good time to reflect on the goals and projects you began earlier in the year.  Have they come to fruition as you planned?  Or do they still need more work to develop into what you envisioned?  There is still time to edit and revise before the next harvest!

photo credit: Pezibear

 

 

 

art, folklore, metaphysical art, pagan

Wishing Everyone a Happy Summer Solstice!

Summer Solstice
Celebrating the Oak King
OakMan-Greenman-w-Oak-Leaf-Wreath-Print

The Summer Solstice, also known as Midsummer and Litha, has been celebrated by various cultures all around the world for millennia. The longest day and the shortest night of the year is a celebration of the sun. In the Northern hemisphere everything is green and growing as we await a fruitful harvest.

The Oak King, the Sun God, is at the apex of his power.  He the God of light, fertility and the harvest.  Born at the Winter Solstice (Yule) he heralds the return of the sun.  His power grows as the year progresses, nourishing crops with warmth and light.

Wishing everyone a joyful and magickal Summer Solstice!

art, magickal fantasy art, pagan

Celtic Sun Goddess Brighid

Fire Goddess Brighid

Celtic Goddess Brighid Fine Art PrintBrighid (or Brid) represents the supreme Mother. She is the Celtic Sun Goddess of fertility, fire, creative inspiration, healing and protector of children. She is honoured at Imbolc, 2nd of February.  Her symbols include blackberries, natural wells dedicated to her and the heart, an ancient symbol of feminine power. She holds a cauldron of fire as the sun rises in a lush green valley.
grain-dolly-for-imbolcImbolc celebrates the Goddess in her incarnation as the Bride of the returning Sun God.  On the celebration of Imbolc, many candles are lit to symbolise the return of light and heat represented by the Sun God.  Grain dollies made from the sheaves of the last harvest represent the Bride.  The Goddess and God await the return of Spring and their sacred marriage at Beltaine.

 

art, folklore, magickal fantasy art

Samhain Crone Goddesses

Samhain Crone Goddesses

In the Northern hemisphere the days are getting shorter and there is a chill in the air. The fiery hues of Autumn decorate the trees. We have processed the fruits, vegetables and herbs of the last harvest of the year to sustain us through the Winter.

samhain-crone-goddess-art-print

Samhain is the beginning of the old Celtic new year. The Crone Goddess watches over this night as the spirits of departed loved ones visit the earthly plane. With a bright candle to light their way, food is served for the spirit visitors. Halloween is the modern adaptation of this ancient celebration.

EPSON scanner image

The origin of the witch stirring her cauldron of brew is most likely the image of Cerridwen, an important Celtic Goddess.